November 10, 2016 – Thursday

​As some of you know, this year, this month, is one of the months, year that makes one of the huge marks in my life. Mainly because I turned the big ’40’ called Ruby Red! Also marked a lot of FIRSTS that I’ve been setting aside to do but thankfully was able to finally do almost all of them, EXCEPT for ONE which will mark the day when I will finally do something DARING in MY LIFE and that is SKYDIVING!!! Super psyche, can’t sleep, so I made sure to check my plan on things that I needed to prepare for tomorrow’s, oh forgot to mention, THE BIG DAY IS MARKED FOR TOMORROW, VETERAN’S Day! My personal way of honoring our beloved VETERANS! 11.11.2016 HERE I COME! Re-post from Travel Guide, thank you! Thank you to Skydive Taft for the images, I will be diving with Skydive Taft tomorrow, thanks for the images!

Today will be the PRE SKYDIVE, tomorrow will be POST SKYDIVE!

SKYDIVING PREPARATION

Tandem Skydiving Facts

At most places you must be at least 18 years old (take a valid photo ID), with a weight limit of 225 lbs.

Loose-fitting clothes are definitely a good idea, as are comfortable, sturdy, fully-attached shoes.  No flip flops!

Call ahead for a reservation, if you can.  However, larger drop zones try to accommodate walk-ins.  Prepare to spend several hours at the drop zone — sometimes up to half a day, depending on the weather and the staffing situation at that site.  Feel free to take snacks and bottled drinks (no alcohol), in case vending machines are not available.

Leave all valuables locked inside your car or with a friend on the ground.  There may be lockers for your things, but probably not.  There will be a place to leave your car keys.

If you wear glasses or contacts, talk to the staff at the jump site to make sure their goggles will protect your eyewear.

A couple of jumps ago, I discovered I am becoming more sensitive to motion sickness.  For my recent jump, I took a non-drowsy Dramamine and that did the trick.

You will watch a video about tandem skydiving that describes the process you will soon participate in.  I have seen several versions of this video. While watching the video (or perhaps after), you will review and sign several pages of waivers — including liability and photograph/video releases.  The skydiving liability waivers are pretty serious, holding harmless the obvious suspects (your tandem instructor, plane pilot, owner of drop zone, etc.) as well as some unexpected others (people who made and designed the airplane parts and the farmer who owns the field next to the landing site, in case you land in his field.  Seriously!!). Read it as thoroughly as you would any legal document that says you are about to participate in a death-defying jump from an airplane.

Next, it’s probably time to meet your “jump master” — your very own professional tandem skydiving instructor.  All of mine have been guys, so I will refer to the jump master as “he”.  He will start to explain the process and your gear.  For the record, a tandem jumpmaster has made at least 500 jumps before (and in many cases, several thousand!) and has gone through a rigorous training program.

suzie-and-first-time-tandem-skydiver-kenny.jpgThe gear you use will depend on your drop zone, but one thing is universal and that’s your harness.&nbs
p; I will tell you right now it is uncomfortable.  It’s similar to a rock climbing or rapelling harness and is specifically designed to connect you to your skydiving instructor.  Just plan on having a wedgie and a tough time breathing.  Remember, you want the harness to be tight and secure!  It will connect to your instructor in 4 places: 2 at shoulders and 2 at hips, but you won’t “hook up” until right before you jump out of the plane.

You will also be given a pair of goggles to wear.  Other gear may include a jump suit and a helmet.  The helmet is soft-cloth and more to keep long hair from flying in your face than for real protection.  As Jerry Seinfeld said: “If you jump out of that plane and that chute doesn’t open, the helmet is now wearing youfor protection!”

In a tandem skydive, the instructor wears the parachute pack on his back.  The large parachute is specifically designed for tandem skydiving and can safely hold 2 people.  There is also a drogue chute that is deployed immediately after exiting the plane.  The drogue will help slow down the descent of 2 jumpers to the more normal speed of 120 mph — which is necessary for the parachute to open safely.  The parachute is usually deployed at 5,500 feet.  There is a secondary reserve chute, and an automatic activation device (AAD) that will open the parachute around 2,000 feet, if it has not already been opened.

Please leave us a commentary or suggestions, we love to hear from you

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Carpe40Diem

SEIZE the DAY!
Live your life to the fullest!
Enjoy what life can offer!

Thank God for today and everyday! Thanks Pinterest!

CA, USA!

Stop complaining and START LIVING!

RizCastro.biz 

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